(Human papillomavirus vaccine)

 

Common English name: Human papillomavirus vaccine

Brand: Cervarix, Gardasil, Gardasil 9

Application: Prevention of cervical cancer and genital warts caused by human papillomavirus

 

 

 

 

 

Drug Information for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

Contraindications to human papillomavirus vaccine

Drug interaction of human papillomavirus vaccine

Tips to consider before getting the human papillomavirus vaccine

Possible side effects of human papillomavirus vaccine

How to keep the human papillomavirus vaccine

 

 

 

 

 

Drug Information for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

Drug Information: Human papilloma virus is a group of viruses that have the ability to infect the moist skin and membranes that cover different parts of the body such as the mouth, throat and genitals. There are many types of HPV. Many of these viruses do not cause symptoms and are completely killed by the immune system; But other types of HPV increase the risk of some cancers. In particular, HPV16 and HPV18 are involved in the development of cervical and cervical cancers. The other two types of HPV (HPV6 and HPV11) are the most common cause of genital warts that are transmitted through sexual contact. Two human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are available to fight these viruses.

These vaccines are called Cervarix and Gardasil. Cervarix protects against HPV16 and HPV18, which means preventing cervical cancer. Gardasil, on the other hand, protects against HPV16, HPV18, HPV6 and HPV11, which means prevention against genital warts and cervical cancer. In some countries, these vaccines are available for girls between the ages of 11 and 14 in immunization programs.

 

Contraindications to human papillomavirus vaccine

Note the expiration date of the human papillomavirus vaccine and do not take it if your medicine has expired.

Never give the human papillomavirus vaccine to anyone else, even if you have the same symptoms.

Do not take the human papillomavirus vaccine more than the dose prescribed by your doctor.

Check for drug interactions with the human papillomavirus vaccine and be sure to tell your doctor what other medications you are taking.

 

Drug interaction of human papillomavirus vaccine

It may alter the function of the medication and increase the risk of serious side effects. Make a list of all the medicines (including prescription / over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) you use and share them with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not change the dose of your medicine without consulting your doctor or stop taking the medicine.

Some drugs that may interact with the human papillomavirus vaccine include "blood thinners" (eg, warfarin), cancer chemotherapy drugs, corticosteroids (such as prednisone, dexamethasone), and drugs that weaken the immune system. (Such as cyclosporine, tacrolimus).

The human papillomavirus vaccine can be given at the same time as other vaccines (using separate injection sites and syringes).

 

Tips to consider before getting the human papillomavirus vaccine

Some medications are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and some medications may be prescribed if additional treatment is needed; Therefore, it is best for your doctor to be aware of the following before taking the human papillomavirus vaccine:

  • If you feel bored or your body temperature has risen.
  • If you are pregnant.
  • If you have a weak immune system. This could be due to illness or medication
  • If you have a bleeding condition such as hemophilia.
  • If you are taking certain medications. These medicines include all the medicines available, whether you are prescribed them or taking them without a doctor's prescription, such as herbal medicines and complementary medicines.
  • If you have a history of an allergic reaction to a drug. You should not use HPV vaccines if you are already allergic to HPV vaccines.

 

Possible side effects of human papillomavirus vaccine

All medications can cause side effects. But many consumers also do not experience any side effects. Some of the side effects go away after a short time of taking the medicine. In case of persistent side effects, the physician should be informed:

Pain, swelling, redness, hives, and itching at the injection site: These symptoms go away quickly.

Headache, joint and muscle pain: Use appropriate painkillers if they are bothersome.

Feeling tired and feverish: This will go away after a while.

Feeling sick, diarrhea, abdominal pain: Eat simple foods. Avoid high-fat and spicy foods.

Consult your doctor if you have any other symptoms that you think may be due to the human papillomavirus vaccine.

 

How to keep the human papillomavirus vaccine

Keep all medicines out of the reach of children.

Keep the human papillomavirus vaccine in the refrigerator.

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