Midazolam Injection

 

General English name: Midazolam Injection

Brand: Versed

Application: Relief of anxiety and worry - sedative

 

 

 

 

 

Medication forms of midazolam

Intravenous midazolam drug information

Dosage and method of intravenous midazolam

Contraindications to the use of midazolam

Midazolam during pregnancy and lactation

The effect of midazolam on driving and working with machines

Drug Interactions Midazolam

Special warnings and precautions while taking intravenous midazolam

Side effects of intravenous midazolam

Intravenous overdose of midazolam (drug poisoning)

Intravenous midazolam storage conditions

 

 

 

 

 

Medication forms of midazolam

Ampoule, oral liquid syringe (midazolam buccal)

 

 Intravenous midazolam drug information

Midazolam (a component of benzodiazepines) is a sedative that controls and reduces the electrical activity of the brain, thus helping to stop seizures and reduce anxiety. Midazolam comes in a variety of forms, including oral ampoules and syringes (midazolam bucal), intravenous midazolam (ampoules) to reduce anxiety (as a pre-anesthetic), and midazolam bucal to treat seizures in children. In this article, we will give a complete description of intravenous midazolam.

Intravenous midazolam (brand name ersVersed) is injected to reduce anxiety and worry and as a pre-anesthetic drug before performing some surgical operations on the patient.

 

Dosage and method of intravenous midazolam

Carefully read the package leaflet before starting treatment with intravenous midazolam. If you have any questions about how to use this medicine, ask your doctor.

Intravenous midazolam is usually injected into you by a nurse in a hospital before surgery and anesthesia. The dose and amount of the injection is determined by your doctor.

 

Contraindications to the use of midazolam

Note that midazolam should be injected intravenously before its expiration date.

Never give intravenous midazolam to another person, even if you have the same symptoms.

Check for drug interactions with intravenous midazolam, and if you are taking a drug that interacts with this drug, talk to your doctor about using your medications.

 

Midazolam during pregnancy and lactation

During pregnancy and lactation, you should not use the drug arbitrarily without consulting your doctor. Medications can have devastating effects on the fetus or on yourself.

 

The effect of midazolam on driving and working with machines

Intravenous midazolam makes you drowsy, make sure you are alert before driving or operating machinery.

 

 Drug Interactions Midazolam

Drug interactions may alter drug performance and increase the risk of serious side effects. Make a list of all the medicines (including prescription / over-the-counter and herbal medicines) you use and share them with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not change the dose of your medicine without consulting your doctor or stop taking the medicine.

Some medications that may interact with midazolam include delavirdin, HIV protease inhibitors (such as ritonavir, saquinavir, atazanavir), and sodium oxybate.

The specific medications listed below can increase the risk of side effects from midazolam (such as slow breathing, severe drowsiness, and dizziness) if medications such as alcohol, sleeping pills, or anti-anxiety medications (such as alprazolam) are used. Diazepam, zolpidem, antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine, anticonvulsants (carbamazepine), barbiturates, phenobarb (phen) Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking psychotropics (eg, phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine), muscle relaxants and painkillers (such as codeine).

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergies or cough and cold medicines) because some of them are made up of substances that cause drowsiness. Ask your pharmacist how to use them so that you can use them safely.

 

Special warnings and precautions while taking intravenous midazolam

Some medications may not be prescribed under certain conditions, and some medications may be prescribed if additional treatment is needed; Therefore, it is best for your doctor to be aware of the following before taking midazolam:

  • If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or breast-feeding your baby.
  • If you have any liver or kidney problems.
  • If you have long-term respiratory problems such as asthma or sleep apnea.
  • If you have a heart problem.
  • If you have muscle weakness such as myasthenia gravis.
  • If you are taking certain medications. These medicines include all the medicines available, whether you are prescribed them or taking them without a doctor's prescription, such as herbal medicines and complementary medicines.
  • If you have a history of an allergic reaction to a drug.

 

Side effects of intravenous midazolam

All medications can cause side effects. But many consumers also do not experience any side effects. Some of the side effects go away after a short time of taking the medicine. In case of persistent side effects, the physician should be informed:

Drowsiness, confusion and dizziness: Avoid driving and working with tools.

Feeling sick, nauseous: This complication should go away soon.

Consult your doctor if you have any other symptoms that you feel may be due to intravenous midazolam.

 

Intravenous overdose of midazolam (drug poisoning)

Do not take more than the dose prescribed by your doctor.

If you feel that a person has drug poisoning and you have symptoms such as drowsiness, confusion, loss of coordination and balance, shortness of breath or fainting (weakness), call the emergency room immediately.

 

Intravenous midazolam storage conditions

Keep the medicine out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a cool, dry place away from heat and direct sunlight.

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