Silent stroke symptoms

Silent stroke symptoms

 

Do you know what silent strokes mean?

Do you want to know the signs and symptoms of a silent stroke?

If you are one of the people who have encountered a person who has had a silent stroke and you want to know about this issue or you want to know the signs and manifestations of a stroke, we recommend that you read on.

 

What you will read next:

 

Introduction

What is a silent stroke and when does it occur?

What are the problems caused by a silent stroke?

Why does a silent stroke occur?

What are the symptoms of a silent stroke?

Are silent strokes less dangerous?

What are the signs and symptoms that can be experienced following a series of Small multiple infarcts?

Silent stroke and dementia

Are the injuries caused by this type of stroke compensable?

What can we do to improve the cognitive abilities of the brain that has been impaired since silent strokes?

How to prevent a silent stroke?

Concluding remarks

 

 

 

Introduction

When a blood vessel in the brain becomes blocked or ruptured, a stroke occurs, which in turn disrupts blood flow to that area and oxygen supply to that area. And following this disturbance in oxygen supply and blood supply, the person experiences symptoms such as partial paralysis, speech disorder and gait disturbance. Now let's see what is meant by silent stroke?

What are the signs and symptoms of a silent stroke?

What is a silent stroke and when does it occur?

Some strokes are silent, meaning they have no symptoms, but by following some tips, they can be prevented. Silent stroke occurs when, for some reason, blood suddenly does not reach a part of the brain, by reducing or stopping blood supply and oxygen supply, a part of the brain stops and brain cells are damaged. Basically, when we talk about a stroke, it reminds people, symptoms such as speech problems and movement problems or numbness in their face and body, but we must say that silent strokes are different and in fact these strokes are usually asymptomatic.

 

What is a silent stroke and when does it occur?

Some strokes are silent, meaning they have no symptoms, but by following some tips, they can be prevented. Silent stroke occurs when, for some reason, blood suddenly does not reach a part of the brain, by reducing or stopping blood supply and oxygen supply, a part of the brain stops and brain cells are damaged. Basically, when we talk about a stroke, it reminds people, symptoms such as speech problems and movement problems or numbness in their face and body, but we must say that silent strokes are different and in fact these strokes are usually asymptomatic.

Silent strokes are very difficult to diagnose, because the difficulty is that in these types of strokes, blood flow to those parts of the brain that have no visible function, such as speech and motor function and manifestations, is disrupted. And because it has no external manifestations, it becomes very difficult to diagnose. It is often MRI and CT scans that tell the doctor about damage to small areas of the brain.

 

What are the problems caused by a silent stroke?

According to statistics, silent strokes generally affect only a small and limited area of ​​the brain, but we should know that this damage can be progressive and increasing, that is, if a person has a silent stroke several times, he will at least notice some nervous manifestations, for example, he may have trouble memorizing things and concentrating.

According to the Stroke Association of the United States, the global reference for stroke, when a silent stroke occurs in a person, the risk of a more widespread and symptomatic stroke increases in the future, Doctors also say that if multiple silent strokes occur, it puts you at risk for vascular dementia.

 

Why does a silent stroke occur?

In this section, we want to introduce you to the causes that cause silent strokes. The factors that cause silent strokes are:

  • Diabetes
  • High blood cholesterol
  • Narrowing of arteries
  • High blood pressure
  • Blood clots form in the arteries of the brain or in any part of the body

 

What are the symptoms of a silent stroke?

It is interesting to know that silent strokes have no noticeable signs and symptoms. The damage of a silent stroke is permanent and its effects can be increasing and progressive. Now the question arises, how do we know if a person has had a stroke or not?

If a brain CT scan or MRI of the brain is done, you will see white spots or lesions that show that the brain cells have become dysfunctional, and this is how doctors find out that silent strokes have occurred. These symptoms include the following:

  • Decreased ability to think
  • Loss of balance and frequent falls
  • Changes in mood
  • Balance and posture problems
  • Leakage of urine

 

Are silent strokes less dangerous?

It is a mistake to think that a silent stroke simply means that there is no significant danger. Silent strokes generally only affect a small part of your brain, but unfortunately the effect they cause and the damage they do will be increased, This means that if you experience frequent silent strokes, you are very likely to experience obvious neurological symptoms, such as difficulty remembering things or loss of concentration. Studies show that one-third of people over the age of 70 have experienced at least one silent stroke.

 

What are the signs and symptoms that can be experienced following a series of Small multiple infarcts?

Doctors at reputable research centers around the world say that the signs and symptoms that can be experienced following a series of small multiple infarcts are as follows:

  • Memory problems
  • Emotional problems, for example, when a person in disproportionate circumstances suddenly laughs or cries
  • Movement problems and gait disorders
  • Getting lost in places you are already familiar with.
  • Making decisions difficult
  • urinary incontinence
  • Fecal incontinence

 

Here we need to introduce you to another term called mini-stroke or TIA (transient ischaemic attack). Causes of mini-strokes are:

  • Blood clots
  • High blood pressure
  • Narrowing of the internal space of the arteries
  • High blood cholesterol
  • and diabetes

 

Symptoms of a mini-stroke include:

  • Gait disturbance
  • Severe and sudden headaches
  • Lightness of the head
  • Confusion
  • Blindness in one eye or loss of part of the visual field: this means that a person cannot see objects that are on one side of their body and must move their head and neck to see them on that side.

 

Characteristic of these mini-strokes is that the symptoms last less than twenty-four hours and disappear completely within twenty-four hours. We should know that people who experience these attacks are at greater risk of developing greater strokes in the future.

 

Silent stroke and dementia

We said that inherently a silent stroke may not be recognizable by the symptoms because in a silent stroke the blood supply to a part of the brain is disrupted that has no visible function, so the person may never have noticed his stroke attack, but MRI or CT scan of patient can tell the doctor about the injuries of small areas of the brain. The above may give you the impression that this type of stroke is less dangerous, but you should know that just being unaware of your attack does not mean that the damage is insignificant. Silent strokes usually affect a small area of ​​the brain, but the damage caused by them is cumulative, meaning that if a silent stroke occurs several times, the person will gradually develop complications and clinical manifestations of these cumulative injuries, for example, the person may have trouble in remembering or focus on things.

 

Are the injuries caused by this type of stroke compensable?

you need to know that there is no way to compensate for the permanent damage caused by a lack of oxygen supply to your brain cells, so if the silent stroke occurs it will show its side effects for the rest of its life, that is, it will have its side effects. In some cases, healthy parts of the brain may have the ability to compensate for previous functions in damaged areas, Finally, if the silent stroke recurs and happen over and over again, the brain's ability to compensate for the damage or to cover up the disorders and damage will certainly be greatly diminished.

One of the most common complications of silent stroke is cognitive impairment. Now the question arises whether the problems that have arisen in the cognitive field can be treated?

Rehabilitation therapy is said to help people who have lost some of their abilities due to a silent stroke, Physical Therapists or Physiotherapists, Speech therapists, psychologists, and psychiatrists are some of the people who can help these people manage their cognitive problems. There are some doctors who prescribe drugs for Alzheimer's disease for people with vascular dementia, but so far the effect of these drugs on patients has not been proven.

 

What can we do to improve the cognitive abilities of the brain that has been impaired since silent strokes?

If you or those around you have had a stroke and your cognitive ability has been impaired, know that there are small, practical things you can do to help restore or maintain your cognitive skills, so we will review these together:

  • It is better to do your usual activities at certain times of the day
  • Put your essentials such as door keys, books and glasses in a designated place every day.
  • Make sure you have a list of instructions that can remind you of the steps involved in complex tasks.
  • It is better to pay your bills directly.
  • Use small medicine boxes to schedule your pills so you can take your medicine to the fullest.
  • Be sure to use memory-boosting medications.

 

How to prevent a silent stroke?

Here are some things you can do to help prevent strokes:

  1. Control your blood pressure: We have said that high blood pressure increases the risk of silent strokes. One of the most appropriate ways to control your blood pressure regularly is under your doctor's supervision. If your doctor prescribes antihypertensive medication, it is important that you take the medication as directed and in a timely manner.

 

  1. Be physically active Studies show that at least 30 minutes of aerobic exercise five days a week reduces the risk of stroke by as much as 40 percent. Physical activity will also reduce the effects of stroke, And rehabilitation outcomes in people who exercise and are physically active will be significantly better than those who are not active.

 

  1. Reduce salt intake in your diet: It is said that to reduce blood pressure and reduce the risk of stroke, the amount of sodium salt consumption should be reduced. This amount does not only include salt that you pour on food. Seventy percent of your sodium intake is in frozen, packaged and processed foods, which unfortunately most people do not pay attention to.

 

  1. Keep your weight in proportion: It is better to keep your body mass index in the range of eighteenth to twenty-fifth.

 

  1. Quit smoking If you smoke, quitting reduces the risk of stroke. Smoking is associated with an increase in vascular disease throughout the body, including heart disease and stroke.

 

  1. Keep your blood cholesterol levels balanced:

Total cholesterol level should be less than two hundred milligrams per deciliter. HDL, sometimes referred to as good cholesterol, for men and women should be around sixty milligrams per deciliter or more, and harmful cholesterol, or LDL, should definitely be below one hundred milligrams per deciliter.

 

  1. Control Diabetes: If you have diabetes, know that doctors consider diabetes to be a known risk factor for stroke, so it is important to see your doctor at regular intervals and monitor your blood sugar well.

 

  1. Eat regular vegetables and fresh, fibrous foods. It is recommended to eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

 

  1. Avoid diet drinks and foods that contain artificial sweeteners: These artificial sweeteners have been shown to increase the risk of dementia and stroke.

 

Concluding remarks

Silent strokes will not have obvious clinical signs and manifestations, but you should know that they can damage the brain. Silent strokes occur when blood flow and oxygen supply to brain cells and brain tissue are disrupted in a small area of ​​the brain. Silent stroke will have cumulative effects on brain health and physical and mental abilities.

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Address: 393 University Avenue,Suite 200,Toronto ON MG5 2M2,CANADA

Email: info@MarsoClinic.com

Phone: +1(647)303 0740

All Rights Reserved © By MarsoClinic

Terms of Use